Interpol

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Interpol Blue Notice

The International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) is an intergovernmental organization formed in 1923 to work together to prevent and fight crime around the World. It achieves its goals by circulating international alerts, also known as notices, to help tackle criminals and criminal activities.  

There are eight types of Interpol notices, including the blue notice. Typically, each Interpol member country has a National Central Bureau (NCB) that sends critical crime information notice requests to Interpol’s General Secretariat so that they can be published on Interpol’s website. 

Blue Notices            

Interpol issues blue notices to collect additional information about an individual suspected of committing a crime or a person holding information about a crime. This information includes the person’s identity, criminal activities, or location. It helps Interpol track the person more easily while the authorities investigate the case. 

Consequences of a blue notice include facing unwanted surveillance and tracking. Although an Interpol blue notice serves a similar purpose as a red notice, the two have a distinctive difference. Unlike a red notice, a blue notice can be issued before filing criminal charges. After the publication of a blue notice, the Interpol may seek assistance from a member country with the following:

  1. Locating relatives, associates, or friends of the suspected offender. 
  2. Identify persons connected with committed criminal offences. 
  3. Finding witnesses to committed criminal offenses.
  4. Seek the location of someone wanted for criminal charges.     

Other Types of Interpol Notices 

Red Notice: Red notices help locate, arrest and extradite a wanted person to face criminal charges or serve a sentence. An Interpol red notice request must clearly state the person’s criminal activities, name, nationality, date of birth, and other details.  

Yellow Notice: It helps locate missing persons or identify individuals unable to identify themselves, especially minors. 

Black Notice: It helps obtain critical crime-related information on unidentified bodies.

Green Notice: It’s a public safety alert used to warn the public about an individual’s criminal activities and the possibility of them committing criminal offenses in other countries.  

Orange Notice: Used to warn international organizations and the public about a person, an event, an object, a process, or a parcel believed to pose a serious and imminent threat to the public or property. 

Purple Notice: It seeks and provides information on modus operandi, procedures, devices, and concealment methods used by criminals.

INTERPOL–United Nations Security Council Special Notice: Used to inform Interpol’s member countries about groups and individuals subject to UN Security Council Sanctions Committees. 

How Interpol Notices Work 

The Commission for the Control of Interpol’s Files (CCF) is in charge of receiving notice requests from NCBs of Interpol member states. It ensures they meet legal requirements before entering them into Interpol’s databases. 

First, it’s forbidden for the Organization to undertake interventions related to military, religious, political, or racial character. Secondly, the notices must not infringe an individual’s human rights according to Article 2 of the Constitution. Finally, they must have sufficient information regarding the wanted person. 

Anyone subject to Interpol’s notices is considered innocent until proven guilty. When challenging these notices, you must use Interpol’s four official languages, i.e., English, Spanish, Arabic, and French. 

Final Thought 

It is crucial to understand how each Interpol notice works and your rights in case an alert is issued against you. It helps you figure out your next step, especially after an arrest warrant is issued against you. This includes seeking legal help from an experienced attorney because Interpol law can be challenging.